July 3, 2019 Crop Reports


Eastern North Dakota

Brian McNamee

This will be a good test of two soybean technologies and their corresponding herbicides for weed control. Latham® Roundup Ready 2 Extend® soybeans were planted in rows on the left and Latham’s Enlist E3 soybeans were seeded on the right. There is a bit of a planting overlap, which I am sure get adjusted properly when the sprayer runs the proper line.

I’ve been hearing reports of great weed kill with both portfolios this year. It really helped that the Extend window was pushed back to the 10th this year.

Although crop development is behind schedule, they’re turning the corner. Dirty fields are getting cleaned up, and rows are starting to close as plants grow. Have a good 4th of July weekend everyone!

Brian 1

Southeast North Dakota

Gary Geske

I have been walking Latham SuperStrip and MiniStrip research plots the past few days and am very impressed with the rapid growth. One hybrid that keeps standing out is LH 3695 VT2 PRO RIB, which is shown here on the right. Notice how healthy it is. It’s dark green in color with semi-upright leaves. It’s very evident why 3695 was a plot winner last year. I expect it to be a repeat winner in 2019.

Geske 1


Northeast South Dakota

James Keltgen

“Wet” is still the theme across Northeast South Dakota. Another 2 to 3 inches of rain fell this week in many areas. Wet soils are making it hard for farmers to get spraying done. Corn is yellowing due to nitrogen loss. Fortunately, the heat has really moved corn development along. Corn will be knee high by the 4th of July. Iron Deficiency Chlorosis (IDC) also is showing up in soybeans. Remember to choose Latham® IRONCLAD soybeans in affected areas for future plantings.

James 1

Southeast South Dakota

Ramie Coughlin

With all the turmoil 2019 has brought us, I can honestly say that we have some healthy-looking crops. Plants are small but healthy. Soybeans are at V2 stage, working on unrolling that second trifoliate. We should start seeing flowers on soybeans in the next week or two. They will continue to grow in height but will begin their flower process shortly after the Fourth of July. Remember soybeans mature on a calendar year.

Ramie 1

 


Northern Minnesota

Ken Highness

This photo shows LH 4519 VT2 PRO RIB in a Latham® SuperStrip research plot near Horace, ND. Many soybean fields across my area are showing signs of Iron Deficiency Chlorosis (IDC). Our cool, wet conditions is perfect for IDC. If you’re seeing pressure from IDC, check out Latham’s IRONCLAD product lineup to help fight this battle in the future. Also, vigilant in your fight against weeds!

Ken 1

Southern Minnesota

Justin Prokosch

It’s wet! Parts of southern Minnesota have received close to 10 inches of rain in the last month, while other parts have experienced closer to 15 inches. This photo is a shot shows rainfall tracked by my weather station, just south of Redwood Falls.

Justin 1


Northern Wisconsin 

Joe Salter

Most farmers in my area are finishing spraying, but i’s been challenging to get into some of these wet fields. Early-planted crops look good. Pictured here is our Fall Creek plot where LH 4795 VT2 PRO RIB looks to be an early favorite. It’s early vigor and good emergence is showing.  Picture two shows a great looking field of LH 4241 RR.  This is some of the tallest corn in our area, and I’m excited to watch this hybrid finish.

Joe 2

JOe 1

Southern Wisconsin

Greg Mair

Wisconsin crops are starting to come around after we got some much needed heat.  This field is split planted LH 5245 VT2 PRO and LH 5635 VT2 PRO planted on May 15. View a drone video here: Southern Wisconsin Bird’s Eye View


North Central Iowa

Cory Greiman

We noticed some chemical damage on corn plants after they were sprayed Sunday in the intense heat.

Cory 1

Northeast Iowa

Craig Haaland

This field of LH 5725 VT2 PRO in Butler County emerged quickly and is looking really good. This farmer would like to finish spraying, but rainy weather is making it difficult. Corn and soybeans are coming along pretty good across northern Iowa. Keep walking your fields to stay ahead of weeds, insects and disease.

Craig 1

Northwest Iowa

Darin Chapman

 

Eastern Iowa

Jerry Broders

LH 6285 VT2 PRO RIB is looking good at Latham® dealer Mike Wagner’s farm west of Tipton. It handled the 70- to 90-mph wind gusts just fine on Sunday night.

Jerry 1

Western Iowa

Larry Krapfl

A beautiful view of the rolling hills near Norfolk, Nebraska, planted to LH 2887 R2X.

Larry 1 Larry 2 Larry 3

West North Central Iowa

Bart Peterson

It’s interesting to watch two different corn products grow side-by-side in Pocahontas County. The right side of the field was planted to LH 5245 VT2 PRO RIB. You can see these plants are darker green and a little taller than LH 5487 VT2 PRO RIB, which is planted on the left.

Bart 1

Central Iowa

Bryan Rohe

Thanks to the recent heat heave, crop development in Central Iowa has gained some ground. I’d say the corn is still two weeks behind last year’s crop, and soybeans are about three weeks behind. I expect soybeans will flower within the next two weeks. Be sure to walk your fields as we’re seeing water hemp, mares tail and Japanese beetles.

Bryan 1


 

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